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Resources: Victims' Rights and Safety

Resources, generally

  • Victim Services - Promising Practices in Indian Country

    • This resource highlights promising practices for assisting victims of violence and abuse in twelve Indian Country locations throughout the United States. Each description includes the program’s keys to success, relevant demographic data, and a contact for further information. (2004)​

  • Maze of Injustice: The Failure to Protect Indigenous Women from Sexual Violence in the USA 

  • The Indian Nations Conference is the oldest and largest DOJ Indian conference to serve the unique needs of crime victims in Indian country. This website provides information on the upcoming conference and resource materials from past conferences.

  • Not Invisible Act Commission Report (2023) 

    • On Oct. 10, 2020, the Not Invisible Act of 2019 was signed into law as the first bill in history to be introduced and passed by four U.S. congressional members enrolled in their respective federally recognized Tribes, led by Secretary Deb Haaland during her time in Congress. Secretary Haaland, in coordination with Attorney General Merrick Garland, is now working to implement the Not Invisible Act. They established the Not Invisible Act Commission, a cross jurisdictional advisory committee composed of law enforcement, Tribal leaders, federal partners, service providers, family members of missing and murdered individuals, and most importantly — survivors.

    • The Commission’s purpose is to develop recommendations through the work of six subcommittees focused on improving intergovernmental coordination and establishing best practices for state, Tribal and federal law enforcement to bolster resources for survivors and victim’s families, and combatting the epidemic of missing persons, murder and trafficking of American Indian and Alaska Native peoples, as specified under the law. Pursuant to Section 4 of the Not Invisible Act of 2019 (Public Law 116-166), the Commission transmitted this report with findings and recommendations of the Not Invisible Act Commission (“the Commission”).

    • As part of its work, the Commission held seven in-person field hearings across the United States and one multi-day virtual national hearing. The Commission received testimony from victims, survivors, family members, advocates, law enforcement officers, and others through in-person and written testimony. In all, almost 600 attended the hearings and 260 individuals gave testimony to the Commission, sharing their expertise, their experiences, their suffering and hope, and their recommendations to address and reduce the tragic consequences of the crisis of missing, murdered, and trafficked American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Resources, Tribal Law and Policy Institute

Not Invisible Act Commission Report (2023) 

Pursuant to Section 4 of the Not Invisible Act of 2019 (Public Law 116-166), the Commission transmitted this report with findings and recommendations of the Not Invisible Act Commission (“the Commission”).

On Oct. 10, 2020, the Not Invisible Act of 2019 was signed into law as the first bill in history to be introduced and passed by four U.S. congressional members enrolled in their respective federally recognized Tribes, led by Secretary Deb Haaland during her time in Congress.

Secretary Haaland, in coordination with Attorney General Merrick Garland, is now working to implement the Not Invisible Act. They established the Not Invisible Act Commission, a cross jurisdictional advisory committee composed of law enforcement, Tribal leaders, federal partners, service providers, family members of missing and murdered individuals, and most importantly — survivors.

The Commission’s purpose is to develop recommendations through the work of six subcommittees focused on improving intergovernmental coordination and establishing best practices for state, Tribal and federal law enforcement to bolster resources for survivors and victim’s families, and combatting the epidemic of missing persons, murder and trafficking of American Indian and Alaska Native peoples, as specified under the law. 

As part of its work, the Commission held seven in-person field hearings across the United States and one multi-day virtual national hearing. The Commission received testimony from victims, survivors, family members, advocates, law enforcement officers, and others through in-person and written testimony. In all, almost 600 attended the hearings and 260 individuals gave testimony to the Commission, sharing their expertise, their experiences, their suffering and hope, and their recommendations to address and reduce the tragic consequences of the crisis of missing, murdered, and trafficked American Indians and Alaska Natives.

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